Barge

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Tuesday, May 21, 2019, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Library Room 206).

 Eight Dartmouth students presented original persuasive speeches to a public audience and a panel of judges. At the conclusion of the event, Balt von Huene ‘19 was awarded the Benjamin F. Barge Prize for Oratory for his speech, “Lust of Possession.” Peter Charalambous ’20 received one of the Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory for his speech, “Counteracting the Negative State of News,” and William Synnott ’21 was awarded a Class of 1866 Prize for Oratory after delivering his speech, titled, “The Costs of Criminalizing.”

Speech Program Wins National Award

We are delighted to announce that Dartmouth College's Speech program received the NCA's Rex Mix award this year. Each year the National Communication Association awards the Rex Mix Program of Excellence Award to the nation's "top undergraduate communication program." Nominated programs are evaluated for excellence in curriculum, program quality, course design, and special programs. We are delighted to announce that Dartmouth College's Speech program received the NCA's Rex Mix award this year.

The award is a welcome recognition for the program's recent advancements. Helmed by professors Josh Compton, Darlene K. Drummond, and Svetlana Grushina, the Speech program at Dartmouth has undergone something of a renaissance over the past ten years. In 2008, the program offered only three courses; since that time the curriculum has increased more than fourfold and now includes cutting-edge classes in health communication, sustainablity rhetoric, credibility, new media, political humor, and social justice. Despite its modest size and origins, the program now enjoys a remarkable popularity and exercises potent influence on Dartmouth's campus and the surrounding community.

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Thursday, May 18, 2017, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Library Room 206).
 
Eight Dartmouth students presented original persuasive speeches to a public audience and a panel of judges. At the conclusion of the event, Titus Kabega '17 was awarded the Benjamin F. Barge Prize for Oratory, and Jonathan Lu ‘19 and Morgan Corley ‘18 each received Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory.
 

 

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

Titus Kabega ’17, Syed Rakin Ahmed ’18, Sophie Hoffman ’16 (Barge Prize Winner), Nathaniel Goss ’16, Leehi Yona ’16, Guillermo Amaro Chacon ’18 (1866 Prize Winner), Max Parker '17 (1866 Prize Winner)

 

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Thursday, April 28, 2016, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Room 206).

Presidential Speechwriters to Speak at Dartmouth

 

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric will host its fourth annual event on "The Art of Presidential Speechwriting" February 25. This year, we welcome Don Baer, former speechwriter for President Bill Clinton, and Clark Judge, former speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan.

Baer served as Director of Speechwriting and Research and Chief White House Speechwriter, among other roles, for President Clinton. He worked on every State of the Union address from 1995-2000 and many other major Presidential addresses, and he was an important part of Clinton’s 1996 successful re-election effort. Baer is now Worldwide Vice Chairman of Burson-Marsteller, a strategic communications firm, and Chairman of Penn, Schoen & Berland, a research firm.

Nine Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

The Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory are Dartmouth traditions reaching back to the earliest days of the 20th century. For over 100 years, Dartmouth students have competed for these coveted awards, which honor excellence in oratory and rhetoric.

The Benjamin F. Barge Prize was established in 1901 to honor the Dartmouth senior who is determined by a panel of expert judges to "write and pronounce in public an English oration in the best manner." The Class of 1866 Prize, established in 1905, awards "excellence in original oration" to one junior and one sophomore student. The prizes are awarded each year after an evening of spirited oration, where a handful of select students compete to give the most persuasive and best-delivered speech.

Speech professor and contest organizer Josh Compton believes that this event is an important tradition for the College. "Even in a contest setting, speech can be a reflection of dialogue, of the collaborative processes between speaker and listener, of working together to figure out challenging situations, of trying to answer difficult questions, or trying to question difficult answers,” he notes.

Reagan and Clinton Speechwriters Meet With Dartmouth Students

Keith Chapman

Just days after a long election season that featured hundreds of political speeches, almost two dozen Dartmouth students gathered to hear a few more—this time from presidential speechwriters.

Dartmouth Trustee Peter Robinson ’79, who worked for President Reagan, and Donald Baer, who wrote for President Clinton, recalled experiences working with the presidents, gave advice about writing speeches, and talked informally with students over lunch.

“This has been wonderful,” said Josh Compton, senior lecturer in speech. “We’ve had a great discussion and we’ve learned a lot from their stories and advice.”

The event, hosted by the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, had two parts, first a conversation between speechwriters and students, followed by a lunch reception with Institute faculty, members of its steering committee, and administrators.