News & Events

  • Each year Dartmouth College recognizes a single lecturer for his or her outstanding academic research. We are happy to announce that this year's recipient of the Distinguished Lecturer Award is the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric's own Josh Compton.

    Professor Compton is perhaps the world's leading scholar of what is known as inoculation theory. While conventional rhetorical analysis focuses on ways to achieve consensus and persuade audiences, inoculation theory examines how...

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  • RWIT's head writing assistant, Joseph Singh '14, was recently named a Rhodes Scholar for 2014.

    Singh plans to pursue a degree in international security policy at the University of Oxford next year.

    Congratulations, Joseph.

  • At their recent national convention, Pi Kappa Delta—the nation's oldest collegiate speech and debate organization—named the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric's Josh Compton the editor of their journal, The ForensicThe Forensic publishes work in argumentation, public speaking, and intercollegiate speech and debate activities.

    This prestigious appointment reflects Compton's distinguished reputation as a scholar. Former editor Nina-Jo Moore says of Compton's...

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  • Laura Braunstein

    Each spring, the Dartmouth College Library honors its graduating student employees with the Student Library Service Bookplate Program. Graduating students who have worked for the Library are invited to choose books, DVDs, CDs or other items for the Library’s collections. Each item receives a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible for...

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  • Keith Chapman

    In this day of Twitter, Facebook, and email, there are many ways to communicate quickly with vast audiences. But a student competition hosted by the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric will highlight one of the oldest, most personal, and most important mediums of communication: speech.

    “I look forward to seeing the accomplished seniors and talented up-and-coming sophomores and juniors take their speaking so seriously, presenting such polished and caring...

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  • This spring, for the second time, Terry Osborne is teaching his community-based first-year seminar, COVER Stories: Community Building & the Environment. This course uses writing and storytelling to take up the very important issue of the conscious construction of community—how it's done, and why it matters.

    Osborne, a Senior Lecturer with appointments in Writing and Environmental Studies, has shaped his first-year seminar around the belief that environmental activism...

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  • Contentious debates over immigration reform call scholars to turn their attention to the rhetoric of immigration. Claudia Anguiano, Lecturer in Speech for the Institute for Writing & Rhetoric, centers her scholarship on the ways immigrant populations are defined. In line with other communication studies scholars, Anguiano uses rigorous, critical rhetorical methods to extract the historical dimensions and significance of terminology, thereby broadening our understanding of the role of...

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  • In Spring 2014, Institute for Writing and Rhetoric Lecturer Sara Chaney will be bringing her long-standing research on autism to the COCO course, "Autism: Science, Story, and Experience." The course will be taught with William Hudenko, an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences and member of the Geisel Medical School Faculty.   This fascinating interdisciplinary course will provide students the opportunity to consider the intersections between science and rhetoric...

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  • This year's Conference on College Composition and Communication, the field's premier national conference, was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, with several Institute for Writing & Rhetoric faculty and collaborators serving as contributors.   Institute faculty Sara Chaney, Michelle Cox, Christiane Donahue, and Karen Gocsik, along with Institute collaborators Laura Braunstein (Library) and Cindy Tobery (DCAL), all made valuable contributions to their various panels and workshops—Donahue as...

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  • Mark Koch, Lecturer for the Institute for Writing & Rhetoric, employs a fascinating medium for reading and writing in his Writing 2 classroom: maps. Rooting his approach in the critical cartography that arose in the 1990s among scholars in geography and in the humanities, Koch takes the position that maps are never value-free images. Like all texts—they inscribe power relations. Accordingly, he not only teaches his students to read maps rhetorically, for their encoded messages, he also...

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