Speech

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Tuesday, May 21, 2019, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Library Room 206).

 Eight Dartmouth students presented original persuasive speeches to a public audience and a panel of judges. At the conclusion of the event, Balt von Huene ‘19 was awarded the Benjamin F. Barge Prize for Oratory for his speech, “Lust of Possession.” Peter Charalambous ’20 received one of the Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory for his speech, “Counteracting the Negative State of News,” and William Synnott ’21 was awarded a Class of 1866 Prize for Oratory after delivering his speech, titled, “The Costs of Criminalizing.”

Speech Program Wins National Award

We are delighted to announce that Dartmouth College's Speech program received the NCA's Rex Mix award this year. Each year the National Communication Association awards the Rex Mix Program of Excellence Award to the nation's "top undergraduate communication program." Nominated programs are evaluated for excellence in curriculum, program quality, course design, and special programs. We are delighted to announce that Dartmouth College's Speech program received the NCA's Rex Mix award this year.

The award is a welcome recognition for the program's recent advancements. Helmed by professors Josh Compton, Darlene K. Drummond, and Svetlana Grushina, the Speech program at Dartmouth has undergone something of a renaissance over the past ten years. In 2008, the program offered only three courses; since that time the curriculum has increased more than fourfold and now includes cutting-edge classes in health communication, sustainablity rhetoric, credibility, new media, political humor, and social justice. Despite its modest size and origins, the program now enjoys a remarkable popularity and exercises potent influence on Dartmouth's campus and the surrounding community.

Faculty Workshop: “A Speech is a Dialogue”

Faculty Workshop: “A Speech is a Dialogue”: Dartmouth’s Historical/Modern Approach to Public Speaking

Presenter: Associate Professor Josh Compton

Location: DCAL, Baker Library Room 102

Date / Time: 2-28-19 / 12:15pm-1:45pm


Dartmouth has long treated public speaking as something more than simple skills training, but instead, as a rich, historic, foundational liberal art, and that approach continues to this day. This session will survey some of this tradition, including the discipline-shifting work of James Winans, Professor of Public Speaking at Dartmouth (1920-1942), who argued that studying public speaking must be more than learning rules, but instead, treated as an academic, intellectual endeavor. Josh Compton, Associate Professor, will show how this core argument informs his Speech 20: Public Speaking course, and he will lead a discussion of how this approach to public speaking can encourage better student speeches in any class—or more broadly, in any public speaking context.

Lunch will be provided.

A New Frontier for Inoculation Theory

Along with his longtime Australian collaborators, Ben Jackson and James Dimmock, Dartmouth Speech professor Josh Compton has published a new edited volume entitled Persuasion and Communication in Sport, Exercise, and Physical Activity.

The book features essays from renowned international experts in the fields of sport and exercise psychology and communication, each of which uses powerful insights from inoculation theory and other models of persuasion to discover new ways of encouraging people to increase their levels of physical activity and improve their experiences in sports and exercise.

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Thursday, May 18, 2017, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Library Room 206).
 
Eight Dartmouth students presented original persuasive speeches to a public audience and a panel of judges. At the conclusion of the event, Titus Kabega '17 was awarded the Benjamin F. Barge Prize for Oratory, and Jonathan Lu ‘19 and Morgan Corley ‘18 each received Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory.
 

 

Compton wins "Top Paper" Prize

The Institute's Josh Compton has won a “Top Paper” distinction from the Communication Apprehension and Competence Division of the National Communication Association.

The paper, “Re-thinking anxiety: Using inoculation messages to reduce and reinterpret public speaking fears,” authored with Ben Jackson (University of Western Australia-Perth), Ashleigh Thornton (University of Western Australia-Perth), and James Dimmock (University of Western Australia-Perth) tested inoculation-based messages as a way to alleviate damaging public speaking anxiety of college students prior to and during an in-class presentation. Inoculation not only reduced student levels of public speaking anxiety, but also helped the students to re-frame what anxiety remained as more productive and useful for the speakers.

Dartmouth Students Compete in Historic Speech Contest

Titus Kabega ’17, Syed Rakin Ahmed ’18, Sophie Hoffman ’16 (Barge Prize Winner), Nathaniel Goss ’16, Leehi Yona ’16, Guillermo Amaro Chacon ’18 (1866 Prize Winner), Max Parker '17 (1866 Prize Winner)

 

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric is pleased to announce that the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory speech contest was held on Thursday, April 28, 2016, at 4:30 pm in the Treasure Room (Baker Library). A reception and award presentation followed in the Ferguson Room (Baker Room 206).

New Course Offerings this Spring

This spring the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric will offer five new courses in writing and speech. Several of the courses will be taught by our new faculty members.

Speech 37, Health Communication

Professor Darlene Drummond will teach a new Speech course this spring entitled Health Communication. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of health communication, a field that studies how communication strategies inform and influence individual decisions that affect health. In particular, the course examines the problem of ineffective communication in a health care context—moments when interactions between health care professionals and patients lead to miscommunication, insensitivity and even dehumanization. These moments of failed communication often result in dire consequences when prescribed medical regimens are not followed. 

Presidential Speechwriters to Speak at Dartmouth

 

The Institute for Writing and Rhetoric will host its fourth annual event on "The Art of Presidential Speechwriting" February 25. This year, we welcome Don Baer, former speechwriter for President Bill Clinton, and Clark Judge, former speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan.

Baer served as Director of Speechwriting and Research and Chief White House Speechwriter, among other roles, for President Clinton. He worked on every State of the Union address from 1995-2000 and many other major Presidential addresses, and he was an important part of Clinton’s 1996 successful re-election effort. Baer is now Worldwide Vice Chairman of Burson-Marsteller, a strategic communications firm, and Chairman of Penn, Schoen & Berland, a research firm.

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