Douglas Moody wins Good Steward Award

Senior Lecturer Douglas Moody has been awarded the Presidents’ Good Steward Award for faculty by the Campus Compact for New Hampshire. Moody was nominated for the Good Steward Award for his service as the faculty adviser for the Nicaragua Cross-Cultural Educational Service Program (CCESP), an international service-learning program that is administered by the William Jewett Tucker Foundation.  The Good Steward Award is given to a member of the faculty, administration, or staff member who has contributed his or her professional expertise in service to the wider community and who has significantly advanced public service on their campus.

Mark Koch Wins Whiting Grant

Mark Koch, Interim Coordinator of Writing 2-3 in the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, has been awarded a grant from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to work in London this summer on a project titled "The Rhetoric of Charity: The English Charity Sermon from 1680 to 1750." Koch will explore London libraries to discover more about the charity sermons of late 17th- and early 18th-century England.  His research shows that, while the Protestant Reformation eroded the traditional practice of almsgiving by asserting that divine grace is granted through faith alone and not through almsdeeds, there was nonetheless a need to fund institutions of poor relief and thus to formulate new rationales for charitable giving. The new incentives for charity were presented in numerous sermons beginning around the time of the Restoration. Many of these sermons argued that almsdeeds are accompanied with a sensual pleasure and articulated principles of sympathetic response.

Dartmouth Summer Seminar Application

Note: This is a webform, not an online application. You will not be able to begin filling it out and return to it later. We recommend drafting your responses in a separate document and entering them when you are ready. A PDF and a Word version of the application are available on the seminar website to help you prepare your application.

First-Year Seminar Form #3

This form is used by First-Year Seminar instructors to submit new or changed seminars for approval by the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric and the Committee on Instruction.

Instructions 

·       Please submit this form by the deadline indicated in the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric email to you.

·       You will receive a submission confirmation email after you submit the form. This acknowledges receipt of the form and gives you a copy of what you submitted.

First-Year Seminar Form #2

This form is for use by First-Year Seminar instructors who are repeating a previously-offered topic without significant changes. This form is used to submit seminars to the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric.

Instructions 

·       Please submit this form by the deadline indicated in the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric email to you.

·       You will receive a submission confirmation email after you submit the form. This acknowledges receipt of the form and gives you a copy of what you submitted.

First-Year Seminar Form #1

This form initiates the process of submitting seminars for approval by the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric and the Committee on Instruction.

Instructions

This form is due by the Spring 2017 deadline indicated in our email to you,  for courses taught in 2017-2018.

You will receive a submission confirmation email after you submit the form. This acknowledges receipt of the form and gives you a copy of what you submitted.

Please consider a MWF morning timeslot since we generally have too few requests for those, and too many requests for the Tu Th 10A and 2A timeslots.
for timetable and transcript (maximum 27 characters including spaces)

The following questions are for faculty repeating a previously-offered seminar only:

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Course Description to Appear in Online Timetable

(This box only applies to professors repeating a FYS.)

This description is what students will see on the web in timetable when they select seminars. Please include a very brief description of the types of writing assignments in the course to help students get a sense of the course work. Please make clear to students the ways in which your First-year Seminar is a writing course as well as a course in the announced topic.
Do you want to make changes to your previously-offered seminar (new distributive or world culture categories, new title, or very different description)?

Mark Koch on Maps & Critical Cartography

Mark Koch, Lecturer for the Institute for Writing & Rhetoric, employs a fascinating medium for reading and writing in his Writing 2 classroom: maps. Rooting his approach in the critical cartography that arose in the 1990s among scholars in geography and in the humanities, Koch takes the position that maps are never value-free images. Like all texts—they inscribe power relations. Accordingly, he not only teaches his students to read maps rhetorically, for their encoded messages, he also teaches them to think and to make discoveries by composing their own maps.

Reagan and Clinton Speechwriters Meet With Dartmouth Students

Keith Chapman

Just days after a long election season that featured hundreds of political speeches, almost two dozen Dartmouth students gathered to hear a few more—this time from presidential speechwriters.

Dartmouth Trustee Peter Robinson ’79, who worked for President Reagan, and Donald Baer, who wrote for President Clinton, recalled experiences working with the presidents, gave advice about writing speeches, and talked informally with students over lunch.

“This has been wonderful,” said Josh Compton, senior lecturer in speech. “We’ve had a great discussion and we’ve learned a lot from their stories and advice.”

The event, hosted by the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, had two parts, first a conversation between speechwriters and students, followed by a lunch reception with Institute faculty, members of its steering committee, and administrators.

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