First-Year Seminar: Updated Expectations and Schedules (20S)

The follow table provides updated course expectations and meeeting times for the distant learning versions of Spring 2020 First-Year Seminars

Course Information

Note: The scheduled hour of ARR indicates that the professor intends to conduct the course in a mostly asynchronous fashion. This means that you will be able to participate in the course even if you unable to meet a regular time or if you do not have reliable internet access or access to a computer.

Students must have WiFi for research and be able to access Canvas and ideally, for small group sessions and office hours, Zoom. We will conduct the seminar asynchronously, that is, students will work on their own time and submit work on Canvas.

Course Instructor Meeting Hour Updated Course Expectations
AAAS-07.05-01 Julia Rabig 10  
ARTH-07.02-01 Kristin O'Rourke ARR This class will take place asynchronously. On certain days, I will hold the 10A block open for us to meet on Zoom for discussion (dates to be determined) and will also offer other times for Zoom office hours to check in with students. The Zoom meetings will be optional as not all students may be able to attend live. The class will make most use of Canvas: all readings and films are on Canvas, and I plan to post mini-lectures for students to watch and respond to. The course will run on one-week cycles with responses and discussion posts so that you can read, write, and respond to your classmates’ writing. As a writing seminar, this course will consist of short writing assignments throughout the term, which will be revised and edited. There will be reading and film responses due to Canvas, and all writing assignments will be uploaded. We will use peer review and editing as well, as best we can. The course will build towards a final research project, a mini-exhibition created with Powerpoint (details to be given). We will discuss research strategies and how to use the Dartmouth library remotely. I am looking forward to teaching this class and meeting you all online!
ASCL-07.02-01 David Rezvani 3B As per the revised course syllabus, the class will meet on Zoom at 4:30pm EST on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Class attendance is mandatory, except for extraordinary reasons (such as illness, insurmountable technical difficulties, death in the family, etc.). In light of the on-line format, some of the class readings have been reduced. The length of class discussions will therefore vary each session. Class sessions will be recorded and posted for later viewing. As per the syllabus, office hours will also take place via Zoom each week.
BIOL-07.02-01 Brittny Calsbeek ARR We will spend two weeks exploring each scientific topic listed on the syllabus. For each topic, students will 1) Read literature from both sides of the debate and participate in online discussion forums 2) Respond to an online journal prompt that questions their preconceptions about the topic 3) Write short essays defending their view on the topic 4) Peer-review their classmates essays and 5) Respond to an online journal prompt to explore how their views and knowledge of the topic havea changed based on their research. We will have weekly online group office hours via Zoom, and individual office hours via Zoom to discuss first drafts of papers. This format is intended to promote critical thinking through a continuous dialogue with the instructor and your peers. As this is the first time the course is offered online, changes to the format of assignments and discussions will be made as needed to facilitate student needs and promote engagement with our online course community. All discussion, ideas, and opinions will be welcome.
CHEM-07.03-01 Jane Lipson ARR Most of the interaction will be asynchronous, with the idea of planning much reduced weekly interactions in smaller (breakout) groups, e.g. for peer feedback on writing progress, scheduled using student availability. I expect to use Zoom for WA student meetings and for my own meetings with students, to be scheduled with each student. Canvas discussions will involve subgroups since a 16 person discussion group would be unwieldy. I expect there to be prompts, with student contributions to occur over well defined time periods. For example, proposed discussion questions to be posted twice a week at well defined times, and then subsequent discussions within each subgroup that will require back-and-forth contributions from everyone over the next 24 or 36 hours (i.e. not in real time over a pseudo 2-hour class period). There will be links to video contributions from our WA (e.g. about peer review), from me (regularly), and (I hope) from our Library expert (e.g. about sources and research). If all students were available in a particular day/time period and all *wanted* to Zoom together, I would be open to that, but it seems unlikely, and will not be my expectation.
COLT-07.16-01 Paul Carranza ARR  
ENGL-07.43-01 Patricia Stuelke 10A The class can be completed asynchronously. I will hold the 10A block open for us to meet on Zoom for discussion, but these meetings may not happen every T/Th and will always be optional. The course will run on one week cycles, with mid-week and end-of-the-week due dates for discussion posts so that you can read, write, and respond to your classmates’ writing. The course will build towards a final paper for which you have two options. 1) Research a song, artist, or album of your choosing, and make an argument about the work of the music and/or star in its historical context. 2) Research and make an argument about the fan investments of a particular musical audience and/or scene from the last 10 years. This paper will be scaffolded with mini-assignments including proposal, revised proposal after targeted online library research, primary source presentation, drafts, and draft workshops.
ENVS-07.14-01 David Lutz 2A This Spring term is going to be very different than prior semesters here at Dartmouth. We will be utilizing remote technology during the entire course of the term for our class, and therefore we will need to make some adjustments in order to facilitate best learning practices and construct an effective learning environment for each of you. I have gone over the syllabus for the term and have made the following adjustments accordingly: 1) Each meeting will take place on Zoom where we can discuss our readings and construct break-out groups for smaller group discussions. I have found Zoom to be very effective and easy to use, although it requires a stable internet connection and a functioning webcam/audio system. I will help you all learn how to use this technology so you can make the most out of our meetings. 2)All meetings will be recorded and be available for later viewing. Obviously, since we will be operating in a remote learning situation, there may be issues related to technology or access and therefore there may be instances when you cannot connect via Zoom. These recordings will help you follow along and keep up with where we are. 3) I will perform virtual office hours twice a week in which you can Zoom in and talk with me to make sure that you are up to speed. In addition, each student will have 3 one-on-one conferences with me that will now also take place via Zoom; these meetings will ensure that your writing products are coming along smoothly. 4) I am considering shifting some writing workshops to asynchronous format so that you all can meet as needed with partners and small groups; this will help as the term reaches the final few weeks so that your timing is more flexible. 5) There is no mandate on attendance and prompts on Canvas will be emphasized since those can be performed asynchronously. 6) I will provide weekly organizational sheets for you so you can see all the assignments, revisions, workshops, prompts, and office hours so that you can stay on top of your schedule. 7) I will adjust Assignment 3 which originally was an in-class presentation, and migrate it to be an online presentation instead with an adjusted rubric. 8) Although this will not be a traditional semester, I am looking forward to getting to know you and being creative in finding ways to help your writing and research capacities!
ENVS-07.15-01 Sarah Smith ARR I will hold drop-in Zoom office hours during our existing hour, as well as later in the afternoon. Students will meet via Zoom for discussions in small groups at student-designated times. I will post all materials to Canvas and we will use discussion boards and Google Docs to communicate and coordinate.
FILM-07.15-01 Joanna Rapf ARR Students must have WiFi for research and be able to access Canvas and ideally, for small group sessions and office hours, Zoom. We will conduct the seminar asynchronously, that is, students will work on their own time and submit work on Canvas.
GEOG-07.14-01 Jonathan Winter 2 Humans have radically altered the distribution of water on Earth. We’ve built cities in deserts supplied with water from hundreds of miles away, extracted enough groundwater to alter the Earth’s gravitational field, and dammed sixty-five percent of global freshwater flows. This course will: 1) Introduce students to the physical geography of water, 2) Survey human interactions with water through case studies from around the world, and 3) Explore how climate change and population growth will affect future water availability and quality. Exercises, lectures, and assignments will emphasize synthesizing and distilling complex scientific ideas with clarity. Assignments will include reading reactions, a 5-minute presentation, a 1-page opinion editorial that addresses a facet of water management, and a 5-page review article focused on a pressing water-related issue suitable for submission to a scientific journal. Drafts of the opinion editorial and review article will receive peer and professor feedback in a workshop setting. Classes will be held virtually via Zoom at the regularly scheduled time. Attendance will be highly encouraged but not mandatory, and all class meetings will be recorded for later viewing. Virtual office hours will be flexible to accommodate student schedules, particularly students who are unable to attend Zoom class meetings. Assignments and peer review will be managed through Canvas. Required books for the course include "Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water" by Mark Reisner and "The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century" by Steven Pinker.
GOVT-07.12-01 Jeffrey Friedman 2 We will hold roughly 2/3 of our regularly-scheduled seminars on Zoom. We will replace roughly 1/3 of our classes with written assignments that students post to online message boards. The course website now contains a series of scanned readings so that students can conduct research without access to a library. The course will not require any material for purchase.
GOVT-07.03-01 Deborah Brooks 11 COURSE TOPIC:  The readings for this course are largely classics, while many of the discussions and assignments shift somewhat in response to the big political issues of the day.  In light of COVID-19, our discussions will focus especially on how the media functions in crisis situations (pandemics, terrorism, war, economic downturns, etc.) versus times of “normal politics”; additionally, the 2020 elections and how the media covers campaigns will also be a topic of relevance for this pre-election term.  However, in order to analyze those issues, we still need to have a firm command the baseline of how the media has evolved over time, and what we can expect from it under normal conditions. WRITING INSTRUCTION:  This course now has one paper that will be rewritten several times, with peer review included in that process  The blog writing project will get a larger footprint in the course this term, with a focus on crisis reporting about the pandemic.  In addition to contributions to Canvas discussions, students will now keep a “Response Journal” with their responses to questions I pose to the class about the readings and/or lectures. STRUCTURAL CHANGES:  Due to possible scheduling challenges for online work this term (connection issues, time zone differences, et), all required parts of the course will be asynchronous (that is, recorded or saved, rather than “live”), while also being “coordinated” (i.e., finish doing X by Y date/time) so that most will be roughly on the same track (barring illness, emergencies, or other complexities.)  This class always had a number of in-class activities (worksheets, exercises, etc.); those will now be completed outside of class time, with group vs. individual completion usually being left to an individual’s discretion.  I plan to offer optional – but strongly encouraged – non-recorded, synchronous (“live”) discussions during the assigned class time roughly once time per week  Office hours will be offered via Zoom (or phone, for anyone with connection issues) will also be available at a couple of different times during the week. 
HIST-07.03-01 Cecilia Gaposchkin ARR This class will be taught asynchronously although I hope to have sustained engagement with and among students through synchronous and asynchronous technologies. The course is centered the person of Joan of Arc, the 17-year old peasant girl who, between 1419 and 1421 changed the course of the Hundred Years War, was put on trial for heresy for doing so, and then ended her days at 19 on the stake. As a writing seminar, we will have a number of different types of revised- and non-revised writing assignments. The research component will be fulfilled by a collective project of writing together a biography on Joan of Arc.
HIST-07.35-01 Jorell Melendez-Badillo ARR The course will be asynchronous. Every Sunday I will upload the following week's materials. Students can work at their own pace and organize their time however they best see fit. I will also be organizing the course in weekly thematic units, instead of dividing it into the two-day schedule. Discussion will take place through the Canvas' discussion boards. Furthermore, since it was supposed to be a seminar, I will limit my lecture videos to 5-6 minutes and each one will be theme specific. The course explores a single event--the War of 1898--from multiple historical perspectives. Thus, the course aspires to introduce students to historical thinking and writing. Since the course will be ""credit/no credit,"" I will encourage students to envision it as a way to polish their intellectual toolboxes. Ultimately, assignments have been revised and students are expected to write a short critical analysis of a primary source (500-800 words) and two short history papers (1,500 words each). The final project will be a collective exercise where students will create a webpage based on the two short history papers they write for the class.
HIST-07.27-01 Pamela Voekel ARR We will be meeting, but less frequently than during a normal quarter. We will find mutually agreed upon times to meet rather than meet at the regular course hour; a number of students live on the West Coast and are on Pacific Time. We will occasionally divide into groups of eight or groups of four to accommodate everyone's schedules and to discuss the material in small groups. There will be slightly less reading.
ITAL-07.07-01 Nancy Canepa ARR This course will be held mostly asynchronously, though smaller subsets of the class will meet synchronously. Readings, short lecture videos, Canvas discussion posts, Canvas writing and peer review exercises, live small-group discussions, and live weekly group office hours (as well as individual office hours) will all be parts of the course. Students should purchase the two required books listed on the Timetable.
LING-07.03-01 David Peterson 2A Classes will be held synchronously via Zoom. During class meetings, we will discuss the readings, address specific issues in research and writing as they come up, and workshop student papers. Students will also meet in small groups to critique drafts for each other. Class meetings will be recorded in case students are unable to attend and wish to review the class content at a later time. Students will write brief responses to scheduled readings via Canvas before each class. Besides these responses, writing activities will include composition of two (around five- to six-page) papers. These will go through three drafts before a final grade is assigned. Students will also work collaboratively to compose brief abstracts for two of the papers we will be reading. Towards the end of the term, students will make brief presentations to the class for one of their papers.
MATH-07.03-01 Andrea Kremer 10A This term our three primary objectives in this class are as follows: to create a collaborative, supportive learning environment, to improve our communication skills, and to utilize (as data scientists) a statistical methodology that helps us read articles and data as skeptical investigators. More specifically, by performing a critical analysis of the assigned material, we will evaluate the extent of misconceptions and ill-conceived evidence and discuss the inaccurate portrayal of the purported facts (“facts” that may have profound political, economic, or psycho/social implications). Students will participate in the following ways: annotate assigned articles (which I will provide), perform guided research projects, and submit weekly writing assignments (three to five pages each). In addition, students will “meet” in Zoom for scheduled class meetings, breakout meetings, office hours and individual meetings. Students also will participate in discussion groups in Canvas.
PHIL-07.01-01 Ann Bumpus ARR Students will be divided into groups based on their time-zones and areas of interest. Class will be conducted asynchronously for the most part. However, groups will meet via Zoom or other technology for discussion and peer review, synchronously if possible. I will hold regular office hours via Zoom, and I hope to meet with each group once per week at a mutually convenient time. In addition to regular short assignments, students will complete three more substantive assignments, two of which will be papers. For the third assignment, students will be encouraged to work in groups to research a specific topic and then to teach their classmates what they have learned by creating a website, hosting a debate, or making a podcast. (Students with a strong preference for independent work may opt to write a third paper instead.) Students will need some internet connectivity for this class, but video capability is not required.
PHYS-07.07-01 Martin Wybourne 2A Nanotechnology and Society will introduce students to the field of nanotechnology in the context of societal implications. Starting from an historical perspective, the class will explore how Nobel laureates, futurists, gray goo, Geckos, Scotch tape and Silicon Valley have shaped the tangled web of nanotechnology. Through reading different genres of publication, the class will untangle this web to discover how nanotechnology has both enriched our lives and engendered exaggerated promises. The technical level of the class will be appropriate for non-science majors. Students will develop an appreciation of nanotechnology and related terminology through critical reading, virtual-class discussion, and individual research. Writing will be central to the class, with reading assignments informing student compositions. Technology to be used for online classes: 1. Canvas for class logistics, reading/video assignments, discussions and submitting written work and grades. 2. Zoom for virtual classes and virtual office hours. 3. PPT presentations that are part of virtual classes will be shared with students. 4. Email for sending drafts to instructor for comments. Revised Organization: 1. Synchronous virtual classes will be held in the 2A period. Classes will include discussion of reading assignments with PPT presentation by the instructor to help with terminology and concepts. 2. Students will be divided into four discussion groups. Groups will be encouraged to discuss topics and drafts of writing assignments. Students can choose what platforms to use. Professor will join discussion groups as requested. 3. Virtual office hours: Help with reading and writing assignments. Arranged for individual students, or groups of students. Flexible times to meet student schedule. 4. The instructor will provide comment on drafts of written work. Details to be discussed with students during first class. Revised Writing Assignments: 1. Elevator Pitch, “The Nanoworld.” 800 Words. 2. Essay: “Differing views of nanotechnology.” 1100 Words 3. College newspaper article: Synopsis of video lecture. 1100 Words 4. Essay: About the societal impact of a nanotechnology related topic that interests you. 2000 Words. The topic might be a current or future use of nanotechnology, or an historical review. Discuss topic with instructor before starting.
PSYC-07.02-01 Richard Granger 2A
  1. Humans are hugely different from other species: we build houses, planes, internets, and they don't. How did our brains get this way? In what ways do we differ from other animals? We will read, discuss, and write extensively about these topics. Participation is encouraged; questions are encouraged; critical thinking is encouraged.
  2. Many of the central topics in the course are surprising, counterintuitive, controversial. We will explore these issues with appropriate skepticism, in our discussions and in our writing.
  3. The entire course will be carried out online: all classes are via zoom; all announcements, reading matter, and scheduling are via canvas.
  4. Watch the canvas announcements board! I'll use it to announce assignment details, schedule changes, due dates, and so on.
  5. Class meetings can be roughly divided into four types: lectures, writing discussions, writing evaluation breakout groups, and book chapter presentations.
  6. All classes will be recorded and available for later viewing; much of the course can be carried out asynchronously, i.e., in times other than the assigned class time.
  7. Whenever you can attend the class during the assigned time (TuTh 2:25-4:15), you will be able to participate, ask questions, discuss readings and assignments, all in real time. At any other times, you can participate via the ""discussions"" section of Canvas.
  8. It's likely that not everyone will be available for each session due to time zones or technology shortfalls. Not to worry: a) you will be able to view all class recordings any time; b) you will be able to discuss topics via the canvas discussion boards; and c) you will be able to schedule office hour meetings with me (individual and group).
  9. I'll hold zoom office hours each week, and we'll also work together to schedule other times based on our availability.
  10. Richard.granger@dartmouth.edu -- I'm always just an email away.
  11. The two keys for the term: we will really learn to write more clearly and engagingly; and we will really learn what is known about how our brains got the way they are.
  12. Enjoy this. Be engaged; be respectful; be prepared. Breathe. We got this.
SOCY-07.03-01 Misagh Parsa 12  
SPAN-07.02-01 Douglas Moody ARR This online First-Year Seminar will be quite different than the usual learning experience that we have when we are able to meet face-to-face in Spanish 7. Most of our class interactions will take place asynchronously via Canvas and WordPress and you will respond regularly to Discussion prompts in Canvas about the texts we will be reading and the visual “texts” we will be viewing, and will also need to read and respond to your classmates’ Discussion posts. We will also have regular Zoom meetings and we will use this tool for synchronous communication when our schedules allow, and I will also hold regular office hours via Zoom (or Skype, etc.) at times that are mutually convenient and those times will be arranged in the first week of class. We will not have a regular class meeting at the 9L time (8:50 – 9:55 am EST), but instead will use the “ARR” time for the Zoom class meetings, with a time to be arranged by the consensus of the class. Most of these synchronous class sessions will be recorded, so if you are not able to connect with the rest of the class you can still engage with the material by viewing/listening to the class sessions at a later time. Every student in the class will create a WordPress website/ ePortfolio for the class and I will provide you with more information about WordPress at the beginning of the term. All assigned readings and course materials will be available through Canvas, including links to films and online content that we will read, view, and consider during the term. Due dates and descriptions of all assignments will be provided in Assignments in Canvas and I will provide feedback on your written assignments via the SpeedGrader function in Canvas. All of your completed work should be uploaded to Assignments in Canvas or to your WordPress website/ ePortfolio. It is possible that we may also use Google docs for additional collaborative work and I am open to other possibilities for remote learning this term. I will arrange individual conferences via Zoom (or Skype, etc.) with students on a regular basis and the times for those individual conferences will be scheduled through a tool in Canvas. While participation in the individual conferences is highly encouraged, these meetings will not be required. You may also want to arrange meetings with your classmates via Zoom or other online synchronous tools. I will, no doubt, be amending and refining the syllabus for Spanish 7 as this unusual spring term transpires and the current situation evolves for all of us.
THEA-07.01-01 Mara Sabinson 11 We will attempt to stay as close to the syllabus as planned with three meetings weekly as scheduled. These will be conducted on ZOOM with all sessions recorded and posted on Canvas. If you are unable to attend a meeting in real time, the recorded session will allow you to keep up to date with the course. All reading assignments will be emailed to you at the end of each relevant session for discussion at our next meeting. You will not need to purchase any books for this course, though you will be asked to purchase (or read on line) 2 Sunday editions of the New York Times as indicated in the syllabus.If you have any questions or concerns, please email me directly. This is a new experience for all of us and I will make every effort to stay flexible and adjust assignments and due dates as needed.
THEA-07.01-02 Mara Sabinson 2 We will attempt to stay as close to the syllabus as planned with three meetings weekly as scheduled. These will be conducted on ZOOM with all sessions recorded and posted on Canvas. If you are unable to attend a meeting in real time, the recorded session will allow you to keep up to date with the course. All reading assignments will be emailed to you at the end of each relevant session for discussion at our next meeting. You will not need to purchase any books for this course, though you will be asked to purchase (or read on line) 2 Sunday editions of the New York Times as indicated in the syllabus.If you have any questions or concerns, please email me directly. This is a new experience for all of us and I will make every effort to stay flexible and adjust assignments and due dates as needed.
WGSS-07.19-01 Ivy Schweitzer 2A You might think of Emily Dickinson as a reclusive poet obsessed with death, but this seminar explores the “new” Emily Dickinson, brought to us by digital technology. For years, mostly male editors published THEIR versions of Dickinson’s poems as the “authorized” versions. Now, thanks to free digital access to many of Dickinson’s manuscripts, readers can see what Dickinson herself actually wrote, including all her variants, and this is revolutionizing our view of this elusive poet. By exploring Dickinson digitally, we not only become “editors” of the poems but also participants in a dynamic poetic process. This exploration unsettles just what we think a Dickinson “poem” is, a question that is also transferable to other writers, especially women and people of color, who have been “managed” and presented to the public by editors and a male/white dominated publishing system. As we practice our writing, interpretive, research and critical skills, this course will introduce us to the “new” Dickinson emerging from the plethora of materialist, feminist, post-modernist, queer, and cultural studies approaches to her work with a particular focus on the year 1862, an immensely productive time for Dickinson and the height of the Civil War
WGSS-07.18-01 Reiko Ohnuma 2 The revised version of this course will be divided up into Units (accessed through Canvas), with a specific set of tasks for you to complete within each unit (e.g., reading, recorded lecture, discussion post, film, etc.). Thus, most of the course will be conducted asynchronously (work at your own pace); however, there will be seven live class sessions scattered throughout the term (via Zoom), which I encourage you to attend, if you are able. These sessions will be recorded for future viewing for those who cannot attend. I will hold regular drop-in office hours via Zoom.
WRIT-07.03-01 Colleen Lannon 11 I will do my best to use technology to connect us as a class and provide both group and individualized instruction through the following means: class discussions will primarily take place via Canvas; Zoom-based class meetings will be held at our scheduled class time, MWF 11:30-12:35, and will be recorded for students who are not able to be present in real time; office hours will be held (via Zoom/Skype/phone) on MWF from 1-3pm or by appointment; optional individual conferences will be held (via Zoom/Skype/phone) twice during the semester to discuss works-in-progress. Major assignments will consist of a Comparative Analysis Essay (1250 words), a Scholarly Article Summary/Response (2000 words), and a Short Presentation (5-10 min). All assigned readings and other course materials will be available on Canvas.
WRIT-07.29-01 Daniel Howell 12  
WRIT-07.27-01 James Binkoski ARR Students will (1) watch short videos created by the professor as they work their way through course readings, (2) meet in small groups with the professor via zoom about once a week, (3) complete short, weekly writing assignments, and (4) complete three longer writing assignments, each of which will go through a process of drafting and peer review. Required books to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Structure-Scientific-Revolutions-50th-Anniversary... https://www.amazon.com/Living-Darwin-Evolution-Design-Philosophy/dp/0195... https://www.amazon.com/Fear-Knowledge-Against-Relativism-Constructivism/...
WRIT-07.13-01 Jennifer Sargent ARR  
WRIT-07.22-01 Rachel Obbard ARR PLANNED CLASS SCHEDULE (a) ZOOM-based class meetings at 12 PM (noon) EST on TUESDAY and THURSDAY to build community, discuss the texts further and build our collective understanding, provide some basic instruction (short lectures), discuss assignments for the week, and answer questions. These will be recorded, and while attendance is highly encouraged, it is not required. (b) CANVAS Discussion in response to guided discussion questions, with two required per week and posted Friday and Monday (48 hours to reply). (c) Online “Office Hours” (Zoom, Facetime or Skype) - Mon, Weds, and Fri 3-5 PM EST and Tues/Thurs 8-10 AM EST PRODUCTS STUDENTS WILL SUBMIT (1) One short paper on sport and society (1000 words) (2) One summary of an assigned technical paper (250 words) (3) One literature review of a technology that has changed sport (2500 words) (4) One media project about how digital technologies have affected sport (6-8 minute iMovie or equivalent) (5) Two per week Canvas Discussion posts in response to guided discussion questions (6)You will be asked to upload your major products to your DartWrite digital portfolio and keep a journal of your work for this class in blog form there
WRIT-07.23-01 Susan Reynolds ARR The Art of the Interview online will be conducted asynchronously via zoom and canvas. Each week will include two brief lectures that I will record, weekly discussion prompts and virtual office hours. There will be two short assignments per week, reading and viewing assignments that we will discuss via Canvas, workshops that will be conducted in groups of two or four, and progressive work on the four core projects. These are: Project 1: a profile based on a one-on-one interview, 750 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Writing Project 2: an expert interview based on an interview with someone working in a particular field on an issue that is the subject of public debate, 1250 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Writing Project 3: a profile based on an invented/imagined interview with an historical or current day figure. This assignment includes secondary data to recreate the voice and point of view of the interviewee. 1500 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Option #2 A video interview. Eight minutes. You will turn in intro, questions and conclusion in print. Writing Project 4: An analytical paper that incorporates several interviews representing competing points of view on a subject of your choosing and demonstrates a focused use of secondary sources to support interviews, establish context, and present an argument/point of view. 3500 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Projects and assignments will be peer reviewed with a fellow student. I will also go over drafts with you one-on-one. We will also build on our on-line Dartmouth Interview Magazine. Students will choose one of four roles: Editor, Art Director, Copyeditor, Social Media Guru. We'll talk more about how we will collaborate on this project.
WRIT-07.23-02 Susan Reynolds ARR The Art of the Interview online will be conducted asynchronously via zoom and canvas. Each week will include two brief lectures that I will record, weekly discussion prompts and virtual office hours. There will be two short assignments per week, reading and viewing assignments that we will discuss via Canvas, workshops that will be conducted in groups of two or four, and progressive work on the four core projects. These are: Project 1: a profile based on a one-on-one interview, 750 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Writing Project 2: an expert interview based on an interview with someone working in a particular field on an issue that is the subject of public debate, 1250 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Writing Project 3: a profile based on an invented/imagined interview with an historical or current day figure. This assignment includes secondary data to recreate the voice and point of view of the interviewee. 1500 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Option #2 A video interview. Eight minutes. You will turn in intro, questions and conclusion in print. Writing Project 4: An analytical paper that incorporates several interviews representing competing points of view on a subject of your choosing and demonstrates a focused use of secondary sources to support interviews, establish context, and present an argument/point of view. 3500 words. Please include an additional, brief (two paragraphs) description of the challenges, revelations, benefits, and frustrations of this assignment. Projects and assignments will be peer reviewed with a fellow student. I will also go over drafts with you one-on-one. We will also build on our on-line Dartmouth Interview Magazine. Students will choose one of four roles: Editor, Art Director, Copyeditor, Social Media Guru. We'll talk more about how we will collaborate on this project.
WRIT-07.31-01 Tina Van Kley ARR The class will be conducted primarily via Canvas and WordPress. Texts will be available via Canvas. The core work will occur asynchronously, and involves reading, informed and meaningful participation in class discussions (via Canvas), regular informal and reflective writing (Canvas and WordPress), peer review (Canvas, Zoom if possible), and individual conferences (Zoom, Skype, phone). I will try to arrange full-class meetings via Zoom 2-3 times during the term, but “attendance” is encouraged rather than required.
WRIT-07.32-01 Ellen Rockmore ARR Most readings will be posted on Canvas. Students will be asked to comment on-line in response to class readings. Students should also expect to write approximately one short paper (1-3 pages) a week. There will be at least 2 longer papers (5-6pp), which will be written in stages: a first draft, feedback, revision. The process of revision will include one-on-one teleconferencing with the professor.