Mark D. Koch

Lecturer in Writing
Coordinator, Writing 2-3

I have been teaching first-year college writing all of my career because I believe it is essential for complex academic thinking and because I have always been interested in the pedagogy. Consequently, I have served many years as an administrator of writing courses, most recently as the associate director of the first-year writing program at the University of Michigan. I also read and write on cartography and its relation to literature, as well as on beggary, almsgiving, and gift-exchange economics. Recently, I have been studying the rhetoric of British charity sermons in the 18th century.

Curriculum Vitae
301 North Fairbanks
HB 6250
Department:
Institute for Writing and Rhetoric
Education:
B.A. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
M.A. State University of New York at Buffalo
Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo

Selected Publications

“'A Spectacle Pleasing to God and Man': Sympathy and the Show of Charity in the Restoration Spittle Sermons,"  Eighteenth-Century Studies  46: 4 (Summer 2013).

“Ruling the World: The Cartographic Gaze in English Accounts of the New World."     Literature and Geography. Ed. Richard Helgerson and Joanne Woolway. Special issue of Early Modern Literary Studies: A Journal of Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century  English Literature. October 1998.

“The Desanctification of the Beggar in Rogue Pamphlets of the English Renaissance.”  The Work of Dissimilitude: Essays from the Sixth Citadel Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Literature. Edited by David G. Allen and Robert A. White.  Newark: University of Delaware UP, 1992. 91-104.

“Utilitarian and Reactionary Arguments for Almsgiving in Wordsworth’s ‘The Old Cumberland Beggar’.”  Eighteenth-Century Life 13: 3 (November 1989): 18-33.

“The Shaking of the Superflux: King Lear, Charity, and the Tyranny of Equivalence.” The Upstart Crow: A Shakespeare Journal 10 (1990): 86-100.

Works in Progress

on-going book project: The Economy of Charity: Beggary and Almsgiving in English Literature, 1650-1800.  With an emphasis on charity as a gift exchange, the dissolution of almsgiving in the early modern era, seventeenth-century “Spittle” sermons, early eighteenth-century charity schools and workhouses, and the rise Sentimentalism.