Josh Compton

Senior Lecturer in Speech

I’m interested in how attitudes can become resistant to influence in ways similar to how our bodies become resistant to disease. Much of my work centers on inoculation theory. I help my students see how this theory, and others like it, can guide our rhetorical choices and help us recognize our own responses to attempts to persuade us.

Curriculum Vitae
6-9842
206A Baker Library
HB 6250
Department:
Institute for Writing and Rhetoric
Education:
M.A. Missouri State University
Ph.D. University of Oklahoma

Selected Publications

Compton, J. (2013). Inoculation theory. In J. P. Dillard & L. Shen (Eds.), The Sage handbook of persuasion: Developments in theory and practice, 2nd ed., (pp. 220-237). Los Angeles, CA: Sage.

Compton, J., & Ivanov, B. (in press). Vaccinating voters: New directions for political campaign inoculation scholarship. In E. L. Cohen (Ed.), Communication Yearbook 37 (pp. 250-283). New York: Routledge (Taylor & Francis).

Compton, J., & Kaylor, B. T. (in press). Inoculating against small pox inoculation objections in Reverend Cooper’s Letter to a Friend in the Country. Journal of Communication and Religion.

Miller, C. & Ivanov, B. (with Sims, J. D., Compton, J., Harrison, K. J., Parker, K. A., Parker, J.L., & Averbeck, J. M). (2013). Boosting the potency of resistance: Combining the motivational forces of inoculation and psychological reactance. Human Communication Research, 39, 127-155.

Boone, S., Chaney, S., Compton, J., Donahue, C., & Gocsik, K. (2012, Fall). Imagining a writing and rhetoric program based on principles of knowledge ‘transfer’: Dartmouth’s Institute for Writing and Rhetoric. Composition Forum 26.

Ivanov, B., Miller, C. H., Compton, J., Averbeck, J. M., Harrison, K. J., Sims, J. D., Parker, K. A., & Parker, J. L. (2012). Effects of post-inoculation talk on resistance to influence. Journal of Communication, 62, 701-718.

Compton, J., & Ivanov, B. (2012). Untangling threat during inoculation theory-conferred resistance. Communication Reports,25(1), 1-13.

Compton, J., & Kaylor, B. (2012). Presidents as speech professors: United States presidents’ public statements about public speaking. STAM Journal, 42, 1-19.

Parker, K. A., Ivanov, B., & Compton, J. (2012). Inoculation’s efficacy with young adults’ risky behaviors: Can inoculation confer cross-protection over related but untreated issues? Health Communication, 27(3), 223-233.

Compton, J. (2011). Frustration vaccination? Inoculation theory and digital learning. In S. P. Ferris (Ed.), Teaching, learning and the net generation: Concepts and tools for reaching digital learners (pp. 61-73). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Compton, J. (2011). Surveying scholarship on The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. In A. Amarasingam (Ed.), The Colbert/Stewart effect: Essays on the real impacts of fake news (pp. 9-33). Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company.

Compton, J. (2011). Cramer vs. (Jon Stewart’s characterization of) Cramer: Image repair, late night political humor, and The Daily Show. In T. Goodnow (Ed.), The Daily Show and rhetoric: Arguments, issues and strategies (pp. 43-58). Landham, MD: Lexington Books.

Compton, J., & Miller, B. (2011). Image repair in late night comedy: Letterman and the Palin joke controversy. Public Relations Review 37, 415-421.

Ivanov, B., Parker, K., & Compton, J. (2011). The potential of inoculation in reducing postpurchase dissonance: Reinforcement of purchase behavior. Central Business Review, 30(1-2), 10-16.

Compton, J. (2010). Speaking of speech with the disciplines. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 9(2), 243-255.

Compton, J. (2009). Threat explication: What we know and don’t yet know about a key component of inoculation theory. Journal of the Speech and Theatre Association of Missouri, 39, 1-18.

Kaylor, B., & Compton, J. (2009). Pope punchlines: How late night comics addressed Pope John Paul II's death. In J. R. Blaney & J. P. Zompetti (eds). The Rhetoric of Pope John Paul II (pp. 3-22). Landham, MD: Lexington Books.

Compton, J., & Pfau, M. (2009). Spreading inoculation: Inoculation, resistance to influence, and word-of-mouth communication. Communication Theory, 19, 9-28.

Compton, J. (2008). More than laughing? Survey of political humor effects research. In Morris, J. S., & Baumgartner, J. C. (Eds.) Laughing matters: Humor and American politics in the media age (pp. 39-66). New York: Routledge.

Compton, J. (2008). Political punditry in punchlines: Late night comics take on the 2004 presidential debates. In Morris, J. S., & Baumgartner, J. C. (Eds.) Laughing matters: Humor and American politics in the media age (171-186). New York: Routledge.

Compton, J., & Pfau, M. (2008). Inoculating against pro-plagiarism justifications: Rational and affective strategies. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 36(1), 98-119.

Compton, J. (2006). Serious as a heart attack: Health-related content of late night comedy television. Health Communication, 19(2), 143-151.

Compton, J. A. (2006, Winter). Remembering, forgetting, and memorializing the past: Considering forensics from a collective memory theoretical perspective. The Forensic of Pi Kappa Delta, 91, 27-45.

Pfau, M., Compton, J., Parker, K. A., An, C., Wittenberg, E. M., Ferguson, M., Horton, H., & Malyshev, Y. (2006). The conundrum of the timing of counterarguing effects in resistance: Strategies to boost the persistence of counterarguing output. Communication Quarterly, 54(2), 143-156.

Compton, J. A. (2005, Summer). Rising to the challenge or cracking under pressure: Time scarcity and effects on limited preparation events performance. The Forensic of Pi Kappa Delta, 90, 1-15.

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